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Palaeopathology Of Aboriginal Australians

RRP $752.99

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While their health has suffered enormously because of the arrival of the Europeans, it is assumed that Aboriginal people enjoyed good health before 1788. Using data collected from all parts of the continent, this 1995 book studies the health of Australia's original inhabitants over 50,000 years. It represents the first continental survey of its kind and is the first to quantify and describe key aspects of Australian hunter-gatherer health. The book takes a theoretical approach to Upper Pleistocene regional epidemiology and presents empirical data of the health of late Pleistocene and Holocene populations. Major categories of disease described are: stress, osteoarthritis, fractures, congenital deformations, neoplasms and non-specific and treponemal infections. The author also describes surgical techniques used by Aboriginal people. Offering fresh insight into the study of Australian prehistory and Aboriginal culture, this book will be accessible to specialists and general readers alike. It illuminates the origins of human disease, and will fill a gap in our knowledge of health in the Australasian region.


Multilingualism In The Australian Suburbs

RRP $354.99

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This book introduces a framework for examining bilingual identity and presents the cases of seven individual children from a study of young students' bilingual identities in an Australian primary school. The new Bilingual Identity Negotiation Framework brings together three elements that influence bilingual identity development - sociocultural connection, investment and interaction. The cases comprise individual stories about seven young, bilingual students and are complemented by some more general investigations of bilingual identity from a whole class of students at the school. The framework is explained and supported using the students' stories and offers readers a new concept for examining and thinking about bilingual identity. This book builds upon past and current theories of identity and bilingualism and expands on these to identify three interlinking elements within bilingual identity. The book highlights the need for greater dialogue between different sectors of research and education relating to languages and bilingualism. It adds to the increasing call for collaborative work from the different fields interested in language learning and teaching such as TESOL, bilingualism, and language education. Through the development of the framework and the students' stories in this study, this book shows how multilingual children in one school in Australia developed their identities in association with their home and school languages. This provides readers with a model for examining bilingual identity in their own contexts, or a theoretical construct to consider in their thinking on bilingualism, language and identity.


Otoliths Of Common Australian Temperate Fish

RRP $24.99

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The accurate identification of fish 'ear-bones', known as otoliths, is essential to determine the fish prey of marine and terrestrial predators. Fish otoliths are species-specific when combining size, shape and surface features, and can remain undigested for long periods. As a result, they can indicate which fish make up the diet of various predators, including cephalopod, seabird, marine mammal and fish species. Such studies are crucial for understanding marine ecosystems, and trophodynamics in particular. Increasingly, these methods are being used to understand the diet of some terrestrial predators, also extending to that of humans in archaelogical studies.

Otoliths of Common Australian Temperate Fish offers users a verified reference collection to assist in the accurate identification of species and size of fish using otoliths. It covers 141 fish species from a broad geographic range of the Australian temperate region and includes commercial and non-commercial fish species. A standardised written description of the otolith structure, size and surface features is provided for each species. Included are brief distribution and ecology notes, and regression for both otolith and fish lengths, together with high-quality SEM photographs of the otolith described.

This guide will be an essential reference for marine scientists and marine mammal researchers; ornithologists, fisheries researchers and fish biologists studying age and growth or comparative anatomy; and archaeologists.

Dianne Furlani has worked in temperate marine science for 20+ years in the fields of taxonomy, biology and ecology, predominantly in SE Australian shelf and inshore waters, and predominantly working on finfish species and ecological work typically with links to trophodynamic studies.

Dr Rosemary Gales is Section Head, Wildlife and Marine Conservation Section, Biodiversity Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW).

David Pemberton is Senior Curator of Southern Ocean and Antarctica, The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.



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Heritage Restorations Healthy Heritage Heritage Fishing Find Heritage
Racing Heritage Australia Australian Central Australia

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